Effective medium for Fractional Fick eq.


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  • Some values are tabulated in Appendix A of ref. Proceeding to evaluate Eqs 8 — 10 for the transport coefficients, we find. If we align the basis vector e 3 parallel to the applied electric field E , the transport coefficients 19—21 take on the known tensor structure 2 , 25 , 28 , 30 , 31 :. Here, the drift velocity is defined by the speed. Although this is the case in general, there are situations where the skewness can be defined using fewer than three components.

    The component Q 2 vanishes in this case due to the simple Maxwellian source term used to describe scattered particles. In Cartesian coordinates x , y , z with the electric field E aligned in the z -direction, the transport coefficients take the form of Eqs 27 — 31 and the advection-diffusion-skewness equation becomes. An alternative form of the skewness tensor that makes use of these components explicitly is.

    This form was used by Robson 26 when expressing the BGK model skewness 26 and is valid only when the skewness is triple-contracted with a symmetric tensor, as occurs in the advection-diffusion-skewness equation In both cases, it can be seen that skewness introduces asymmetry in the pulse in the direction of the field. In general, positive skewness can be seen to reduce the spread of particles behind the pulse, while enhancing the spread toward the front of the pulse. In Fig. Each profile has evolved from an impulse initial condition. As the skewness tensor is odd under parity transformation, Eq.

    In our previous paper 23 , we interpreted the trap-induced anisotropic diffusion present in Eq. In a similar fashion, we can interpret the trap-induced skewness present in the perpendicular and parallel skewness coefficients 47 and To achieve this, we plot the skewness against the detrapping temperature T detrap for various mean trapping times in Fig.

    The resulting plots are linear with gradients that characterise of the type of skewness caused by traps. That is, positive or negative gradients correspond respectively to positive or negative trap-based skewness.

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    The gradients in b are of smaller magnitude than a due to the greater dependence of the parallel skewness 48 on the drift speed W as compared to the perpendicular skewness Thus, as the drift speed decreases, the plots in b coincide with those in a. This observation coincides with the illustration of skewness in Fig. When the mean trapping time is zero, the gradients in Fig.

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    This is to be expected as, in this case, trapping and detrapping simply act as an elastic scattering process with a positive skewness akin to Eq. As the mean trapping time increases, the nature of the skewness caused by traps changes, ultimately becoming negative for the parameters considered in Fig. As illustrated in Fig.

    We interpret the increased spread here as being due to particles returning from traps. This interpretation implies that the skewness coefficients could become overall negative if particles remain trapped for a sufficient length of time before returning with a sufficiently large temperature. Indeed, these are the conditions for which the skewness coefficients become negative in Fig. Only collisions were considered in this study and so trapping is evidently not a necessary condition for negative skewness to occur. However, it should be emphasised that the skewness is strictly positive when collisions are described by the simple BGK collision operator, as is seen in Eq.

    The classical Einstein relation between diffusion, mobility and temperature is As seen by Eq. This enhancement manifests as the following generalised Einstein relation By relating the skewness to the temperature tensor though this diffusion coefficient, we find a skewness analogue to the Einstein relation:. Koutselos 34 has presented a similar relationship between the skewness tensor and lower-order transport coefficients for the case of the classical Boltzmann equation. For the phase-space kinetic model described by Eq. Consequently, the time averages defined by Eq.

    Thus, for fractional transport, the transport coefficients 19—21 take on the simpler form Knowledge of the skewness coefficient 59 , as well as other higher-order transport coefficients, is useful for characterising fractional transport. For example, Norregaard et al. We have explored the transport coefficients of a phase-space kinetic model 1 for both localised and delocalised transport. In particular, we have considered up to the third-order transport coefficient of skewness bfQ, which takes the form of a rank-3 tensor. The structure of the skewness tensor and its symmetry under parity transformation was found to be in agreement with previous studies.

    We observed trap-induced negative skewness and provided a corresponding physical interpretation. Lastly, the form of the transport coefficients for the particular case of fractional transport were outlined in Eqs 57 — There exist a number of possibilities for future work. The focus of this paper was on constant transport coefficients that define the flux in the hydrodynamic regime as the density gradient expansion 6.

    Transient transport coefficients and transport coefficients of the bulk were not considered. Another extension to this work could be to explore what consequences energy-dependent collision, trapping and recombination frequencies have on the skewness. Such a generalisation for Eq. Without an applied field, the drift velocity, skewness and all other odd-ordered transport coefficients would vanish.

    The kurtosis can be found in a straightforward fashion from the rank-3 tensorial coefficient f 3 v in the density gradient expansion 7 of the phase-space distribution function f t , r , v , in the same way drift velocity, diffusion and skewness were found using Eqs 8 — Pitchford, L. Vrhovac, S. Third-order transport coefficients for charged particle swarms. The Journal of Chemical Physics , — Dujko, S. Monte Carlo studies of non-conservative electron transport in the steady-state Townsend experiment.

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics 41 , Kondo, K.

    Nonequilibrium Effects in Ion and Electron Transport , vol. Non-equilibrium of charged particles in swarms and plasmas—from binary collisions to plasma effects. Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 59 , Metzler, R. Physical Review Letters 82 , — Scher, H. Anomalous transit-time dispersion in amorphous solids. Physical Review B 12 , — Sibatov, R.

    Fractional differential kinetics of charge transport in unordered semiconductors. Semiconductors 41 , — Schubert, M. Physical Review B 87 , First-passage statistics for aging diffusion in systems with annealed and quenched disorder. Physical Review E 89 , Ageing Scher—Montroll Transport. Transport in Porous Media , — Mauracher, A. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 5 , — Borghesani, A.

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    High-temperature electron localization in dense He gas. Physical Review E 65 , Sakai, Y. High- and low-mobility electrons in liquid neon. Chemical Physics , — Stepanov, S. Advances in Physical Chemistry , 1—17 A molecular basis of the bubble model of positronium annihilation in liquids. Physica B: Condensed Matter , 68—79 Charlton, M. Norregaard, K.

    Nonlinear Diffusion of Ions in a Gas. For the interfaces of the cytoplasm with the compartments and the substances it holds:. Only collisions were considered in this study and so trapping is evidently not a necessary condition for negative skewness to occur. Pitchford, L. Invoking assumption A1 , the distribution of the substances is described using concentrations. As molecular simulation results 46 , 47 indicate the difference in surface energy between the different ice planes is only marginal, it seems justified to use only the orientationally averaged value.

    Chemical Reviews , — Schwarzl, M. Quantifying non-ergodicity of anomalous diffusion with higher order moments. Scientific Reports 7 , Anomalous transport in the crowded world of biological cells. Reports on Progress in Physics 76 , Magdziarz, M. Physical Review Letters , Philippa, B.

    Generalized phase-space kinetic and diffusion equations for classical and dispersive transport. New Journal of Physics 16 , Stokes, P. Physical Review E 93 , Generalized balance equations for charged particle transport via localized and delocalized states: Mobility, generalized Einstein relations, and fractional transport.

    Physical Review E 95 , In both cases, it can be seen that skewness introduces asymmetry in the pulse in the direction of the field. In general, positive skewness can be seen to reduce the spread of particles behind the pulse, while enhancing the spread toward the front of the pulse.

    In Fig. Each profile has evolved from an impulse initial condition. As the skewness tensor is odd under parity transformation, Eq. In our previous paper 23 , we interpreted the trap-induced anisotropic diffusion present in Eq. In a similar fashion, we can interpret the trap-induced skewness present in the perpendicular and parallel skewness coefficients 47 and To achieve this, we plot the skewness against the detrapping temperature T detrap for various mean trapping times in Fig. The resulting plots are linear with gradients that characterise of the type of skewness caused by traps.

    That is, positive or negative gradients correspond respectively to positive or negative trap-based skewness. The gradients in b are of smaller magnitude than a due to the greater dependence of the parallel skewness 48 on the drift speed W as compared to the perpendicular skewness Thus, as the drift speed decreases, the plots in b coincide with those in a.

    This observation coincides with the illustration of skewness in Fig. When the mean trapping time is zero, the gradients in Fig. This is to be expected as, in this case, trapping and detrapping simply act as an elastic scattering process with a positive skewness akin to Eq. As the mean trapping time increases, the nature of the skewness caused by traps changes, ultimately becoming negative for the parameters considered in Fig.

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    As illustrated in Fig. We interpret the increased spread here as being due to particles returning from traps. This interpretation implies that the skewness coefficients could become overall negative if particles remain trapped for a sufficient length of time before returning with a sufficiently large temperature. Indeed, these are the conditions for which the skewness coefficients become negative in Fig.

    Only collisions were considered in this study and so trapping is evidently not a necessary condition for negative skewness to occur. However, it should be emphasised that the skewness is strictly positive when collisions are described by the simple BGK collision operator, as is seen in Eq. The classical Einstein relation between diffusion, mobility and temperature is As seen by Eq.